St. Augustine

Faver Dykes State Park

Faver Dykes State Park

Noted for its pristine condition, Faver Dykes State Park borders Pellicer Creek as it winds along Florida’s east coast highways down to the Matanzas River. Pellicer Creek is a popular site for birding with more than one hundred bird species seen during spring and fall migrations. Songbirds, including the colorful wood warblers, along with eagles and falcons, return to nest at the park each year. Wading birds, such as egrets, wood storks, white ibis, and herons, feed in the tidal marshes and creeks. This peaceful park is also home to deer, turkeys, hawks, bobcats, and river otters. Fishing, picnicking, and nature walks are popular activities. Pellicer Creek is a Designated State Canoe Trail and visitors can rent canoes at the park.

History

The park is named for settler Francisco Pellicer, who built his homestead along the banks of the creek around 1800 after receiving a land grant from the King of Spain. The park was originally part of the Buena Suerte Plantation granted in 1817 by Spain to General Joseph Hernandez. During the Second Seminole War the area was occupied by U.S. troops and in 1950, Hiram Faver, a former longtime Clerk of the Court in St. Johns County donated the land to the Florida State Board of Parks and Historic Memorials.

The Lost Tribe

The Timucuan Indians, Faver-Dykes’ first inhabitants, arrived around 500 B.C. They lived in villages close to Pellicer Creek, which today makes up the southern border of the park. Their homes were protected from hurricanes by the barrier island lying east of the park across the Matanzas River. They lived at Faver-Dykes for hundreds of years and were skilled hunters and fishermen. The forest, river and ocean played an important role in their everyday lives.

State Park

Faver-Dykes became the 63rd park in the Florida Park System and according to then Florida Senate President Verle A. Pope, the park was a needed asset to the system. The State Park was originally part of the Buena Suerte Plantation granted in 1817 by Spain to General Joseph Hernandez. During the Second Seminole War the area was occupied by U.S. troops. In 1950, Hiram Faver, a former long time Clerk of the Court in St. Johns County, donated the land to the Florida State Board of Parks and Historic Memorials. The monument that was dedicated to Hiram in 1967 still stands and is a constant reminder of his generosity.

The park now consists of 6,045 acres.

https://www.floridastateparks.org/park/faver-dykes

1000 Faver-Dykes Road
St. Augustine, FL 32086
(904) 794-0997